Talwandi

Information

Dynasty

Jagir

Talwandi

Hindi Name

तलवंडी

History

The Talwandi, Khundah and Chamyari branches share an agnatic descent from Randhir Chand a Randhawa Jat. Randhir Chand around 1540 settled near Battala. There he built a village, which he named Jhanda after his eldest son’s name. Turga, the grandson of Randhir Chand, left his father’s village and founded Talwandi, the present residence of the family. About 1640, Bahar Chand, a great grandson of Turga, was appointed to the office of Chaudhri of Tappa Dabha, which was held in the family until the time of Pardhan Chand.

Santokh Singh and Sahib Singh, the two sons of Pardhan Chand, became Sikhs, and, joining the Kanaiya Misl with Sardar Jai Singh as their Chief, they took possession of Talwandi and Dorangla. Little is known of the brothers, who were not men of any importance. Santokh Singh died in 1802, and Sahib Singh two years later. Of the three sons of Santokh Singh, Dal Singh was the only one to obtain a share of his father’s jagir. Talwandi and some neighbouring villages were left him. Dorangla and the Sialkot estate were seized by Ranjit Singh, who also took possession of the estate of Sahib Singh. Sardar Dal Singh fought in most of the Maharaja’s campaigns. During his lifetime he divided a portion of his estate between his sons ; Kahan Singh receiving Rai Chak and Chainiwala, and Lai Singh, Talwandi. The Sardar was ‘killed in the Satlaj Campaign in 1845, and his jagirs were resumed. Kahan Singh had died long before his father. He fell in the battle of Saidhu in March 1827, fighting against Syad Ahmad Shah. His only son was killed ten years later, in April 1837, in the battle of Jamrud. Sardar Lai Singh was born in 1798, and saw a good deal of service. He fought in the Multan and Kashmir Expeditions of 1818-19, and at Jamrud, where . his nephew was slain. In 1848 he was appointed to co-operate with Gurmani Lai, the Adalati, or Chief Justice, of the Manjha, holding the command of fifty horse. In 1857, at the requisition of Government, he furnished ten horsemen for service in Hindustan, and sent with them his two sons Hira Singh and Gopal Singh. Both fought gallantly throughout the campaign. Hira Singh was made a Rasaldar ; and in 1859, on his retirement, received a present of Rs. 1,800 and a grant of fifty acres of land near Kurpur in the Kangra district. Gopal Singh was a Dafadar in Hodson’s Horse. He was killed in a skirmish with the rebels near Kanpur in 1858.

Sardar Lai Singh owned half Talwandi in proprietary right, as also Shekh. Bahlol. The proprietary right of the qth,er half of Talwandi is held by the descendants of Sahib Singb. He was latterly an Honorary Magistrate at Batala.

Rasaldar Hira Singh acted for a few years as Inspector of Police at Gurdaspur after the Mutiny. His eldest son, Gurhakhsh Singh, is a Dafadar in the 11th Bengal Lancers. The second son, Harnam Singh, held a similar rank in the 16th Cavalry. The family jointly owned about seven hundred ghumaos of land, of which one hundred were awarded for services rendered.

Sardar Hukam Singh was a Tahsildar in the service of the Maharaja of Jammu and then he served the Amir of Khairpur in Sind on a salary of Rs. 1,500 per annum. Of his sons, Sardar Thakar Singh was Zaildar of Talwandi. He was a Naib Tahsildar for a short period. His brother Ganda Singh was employed as a Ziladar on the Sarhand Canal. A third brother, Earn Singh, was a Kannngo in Gurdaspur, and a fourth, Udham Singh, a Dafadar in the 6th Bengal Cavalry.

Genealogy

  • Chaudhary Pardhan Chand, married and had issue.
    • Santokh Singh(qv)
    • Sahib Singh, his share of the estate was confiscated by Maharaja Ranjit Singh, married and had issue, Joint Jagirdars of Talwandi. He died 1804.
  • Santokh Singh, he and his brother became Sikhs, joined the Kanhaiya misl and took possession of Talwandi and Dorangla, married and had issue. He died 1802.
  • Sardar Dal Singh, he was the only son of his father to obtain a share of his father's jagir, Talwandi and some neighbouring villages were left to him; Dorangla and the Sialkot estate were seized by Maharaja Ranjit Singh; he took part in most of the Maharaja's campaigns; before his death, he partitioned his jagir, married Bibiji Anup Kaur, daughter of Sardar Ram Singh Padhania, and had issue. He was killed in the Sutlej campaign in 1845 and his jagirs were resumed.
    • Gulab Singh, died 1816.
    • Kahan Singh, he received Rai Chak and Chainiwala from his father as his share, married and had issue, one son. He was killed vp in the battle of Saidhu in March 1827.
      • Ajjab Singh, he was killed sp in the battle of Jamrud in April 1837.
    • Sardar Lal Singh, Joint Jagirdar of Talwandi, born 1798, he received Talwandi from his father as his share, he took part in many campaigns, including Multan in 1818, Kashmir 1819 and at Tamrud in 1837; married and had issue. He died 1875.
      • Harsukh Singh, died 1862.
      • Sardar Hari Singh, Head of the Family, married and had issue. He died 1852.
      • Bibi (name unknown) Kaur, married Sardar Partab Singh Bajwa, son of Sardar Bahadur Sardar Jagat Singh C.I.E. of Kalaswala, and had issue.
        • Sardar Gurdayal Singh Bajwa of Kalaswala, born 1900.
      • Gopal Singh, served as Daffadar in 'Hodson's Horse', married and had issue. He was killed in a skirmish with the rebels near Cawnpore in 1858.
        • Gurdit Singh, born 1855, married and had issue. He died 1906.
          • Puran Singh, born 1877, married and had issue.
            • Gurdial Singh
          • Surat Singh, born 1886, married and had issue, four sons.
        • Kartar Singh, born 1857, died 1884.
      • Hukam Singh, formerly a tahsildar in the service of the Maharaja of Jammu, married and had issue. He died 1892.
        • Thakar Singh, born 1843, Zaildar of Talwandi and also briefly a Naib-Tahsildar for a short time; married and had issue.
          • Mit Singh
          • Sher Singh
          • Basant Singh
        • Bhagwan Singh, born 1855.
        • Ganda Singh, born 1859, a Zaildar; married and had issue.
          • Jit Singh, born 1883.
        • Ram Singh, born 1862, a Naib-Tahsildar; married and had issue.
          • Atar Singh, born 1888.
        • Udham Singh, a Dafadar in the 5th Bengal Cavalry.
      • Hakim Singh, married and had issue. He died 1846.
        • Kehar Singh, married and had issue. He died 1899.
          • Khushal Singh, died 1927.
          • Dhian Singh, married and had issue. He died 1912.
            • Chahal Singh, born 1882, married and had issue.
      • Hira Singh, Head of the Family 1875/1889, he was appointed Risaldar and after retiring in 1859, he was granted 50 acres of land near Nurpur in the Kangra district, he acted as Inspector of Police at Gurdaspur; married and had issue. He died 1889.
        • Harbakhsh Singh, died 1895.
        • Gurbakhsh Singh, Head of the Family 1889/-, born 1862, served as Dafadar in the 11th Bengal Lancers, but resigned in 1889; afterwards he was a Lambardar and Sufedposh; married and had issue.
          • Bakhshish Singh, born 1895, married and had issue.
            • Baldeo Singh
          • Jagjit Singh, born 1897, married and had issue.
            • Gurnam Singh
          • Prabh Dayal Singh, married and had issue.
            • Gursham Singh
          • Sohan Singh
          • Jagdeo Singh
        • Harnam Singh, born 1868, served as Dafadar in the 16th Cavalry, married and had issue.
          • Atar Singh, born 1888, married and had issue.
        • Sheoraj Singh, died 1899.
      • Nihal Singh, died 1814.
    • Ran Singh alias Ram Singh, died 1794.
    • Gajja Singh alias Gaga Singh, died 1790.
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